The iPhone 5C is not a “budget” iPhone.

Worldwide Marketing Senior Vice President Phil Schiller stands in front of iPhone 5Cs at the recent Apple unveiling event; Photo: CC BY-SA Globovisión
Worldwide Marketing Senior Vice President Phil Schiller stands in front of iPhone 5Cs at the recent Apple unveiling event; Photo: CC BY-SA Globovisión

The new iPhone 5C is not a budget iPhone.

It’s a smart move by Apple of keeping their profit margins higher, as it costs less for them to produce a 5C and offer it at the last-gen price, than to lower the original iPhone 5’s price to a last-gen price.

With an unlocked minimum cost of $550 in the United Staes, at least one India news source is complaining [LINK HERE] that this is not an affordable smartphone for emerging markets. It is far from that. EDIT: Tech blog Engadget [LINK HERE] has also brought light to this.

By comparison, the new and high-end Moto X smartphone by Motorola – which is, unlike the Chinese-manufactured iPhone 5C (which is already the subject of at least one labour scandal [LINK HERE]) is completely built in the U.S.A. with the most ethical practices, costs $575 unlocked – just $25 more. Motorola is preparing an even lower-cost Moto X that will completely undercut the iPhone 5C despite more ethical manufacturing.

Here’s a graphic from Engadget:

iPhone 5C vs. Motorola Moto X - from Engadget
iPhone 5C vs. Motorola Moto X – from Engadget

And, thus, by concept the iPhone 5C we have come to expect is a massive failure.

It’s just another attempt by the world’s greediest and most irresponsible corporation to fool people (by way of marketing) into giving them lots of money, through exceptionally high profit margins, that they will stow away and rarely if ever use.

Biggest issue B.C. will face under Liberals is a disconnect with young people.

It’s been more than one year now since that day when we stood there protesting Bill 22, outside and in the rain and snow, probably close to some 20000 strong students all belonging to a generation that researchers of this society have labelled with the letter “Y”.

We weren’t just a random group of high school kids who wanted to skip school just to take the opportunity to join a bunch of other people doing it. Granted, there were probably some of us who were out of school for that purpose, but in spite of that, there were a lot of us had real concerns about our education – and we showed it in rallies and protests that, for that one day, attracted attention across the province. We were everywhere. The average joe who kept up would have seen us in Vancouver, Victoria, Nanaimo, Kelowna, Penticton, Squamish….. and even in a small town somewhere north of Prince George.

And then, after that, we had to go back to school.

The reality of being young and needy in British Columbia

It’s hard enough for a young person in BC to show their concerns about their society and their environment; the majority of us, under 18, don’t have a vote in any elections. However, facing school and pressures that take up our daily lives, we really don’t have the time to commit to involvement in protecting our own futures and prosperity. Less yet do we have time to be skipping school and making a big show of it like we did that one time on March 2nd, just to show people that we’re concerned about what’s going on. We don’t have time to launch mega-massive protests like the ones Montreal students did at about the same time over rising tuition fees.

Students protest Bill 22 in Victoria in March 2012
Students protest Bill 22 in Victoria in March 2012

So, what we don’t have an ability to do in this society is properly represent ourselves. We rely on the 85 important and older people who go to Victoria with the hope that they will make decisions that do accomodate us, and steer us towards the prosperity that other generations of past got so that they could become great and successful people, in much the same way we want to be. We have to rely on you, and we can’t rely on ourselves – and that, I believe, is becoming one of the most critical mistakes in modern-day politics in every democratically-run sovereignty.

In May 2012, a few months after the March student walkout and after months of job action, teachers across the province were forced to give up. They accepted a horrible legislation that was called Bill 22, a legislation that has brought to B.C. the worst student-educator ratio in Canada and the associated effects to students and to our society in the indirect ways.

Our say, in addition to their say, just simply wasn’t enough.

Young vs old in BC polls

Yesterday, when thousands of British Columbians took to the polls to get in their vote in the 2013 elections, elementary and high school students across the province participated in Student Vote: a parallel election program coinciding with the British Columbia provincial election. They elected a majority NDP government. But, when the actual elections came, they were then out-voted by the rest of the population.

When British Columbians in a surprise flip elected back the same government that brought us the horrid Bill 22, young people under 18 in British Columbia didn’t have a say in it at all.

We won’t have a say in facing another 4 years of the B.C. Liberal government that has brought us inferior education compared to other provinces in Canada (including the worst student-educator ratio in the country). We won’t have a say in the cutbacks in skills training programs that will affect us as we graduate from high school and look for these programs to get us the skills we will need to start benefiting from (and contributing to) the economy in the future. We won’t have a say in any of this.

On top of that, we also have to face the fact that well over 70% of people in this province simply didn’t think about us when they made their vote. That 70% being: the 52% of people who didn’t show up to the polls at all (only 48% of voters voted in the May 2013 provincial election, a record low), in addition to the voters around the province who brought back the party that has largely governed without our interests in mind for the past 12 years.

There is a growing disconnect between the young population of British Columbia and everyone else.

I think that, starting today and proceeding as more and more of the issues young people face in their society get worse and worse as little is done to effectively solve them, young people in this province are going to lose hope in our modern system of democracy. They’re going to lose hope in their ability to be accommodated in a society that really doesn’t care about young people, has given them a much more difficult situation than was faced years ago by the generations that are now voting their concerns out, and doesn’t have a way to allow them to properly represent themselves in modern politics. (see video above, titled “What Is Generation Squeeze?“)

They’re going to start favouring something much more convoluted and scary in nature: something else.

In my view, this will create a tendency in British Columbians’ generation Y and (as they grow) generation Z: a tendency for us to be generally dissatisfied, unhappy, rebellious, and perhaps violently rebellious in our futures, as a result of the inconveniences we faced as a result of an incompetent government surrounding us at our young age. It will have dire consequences on the stability, economy and strength of this entire province.

That, I believe, is going to become this province’s single biggest future issue.

That, or the fact that based on the elections results there are probably few – if any – educated people in British Columbia who will ever take my concerns about the growing disconnect between young people and their society seriously.

Smiling at the demise of Apple computer

Apple R&D spendings
Apple R&D spendings percentage compared to the competition
Some things to know about Apple:
  1. Sits on a $137 billion cash mountain and is hurting the economy by not spending it for any useful purpose, or returning it to investors
  2. Spends only a tiny percentage of its profits on actual research and development, and lags behind competitors in this percentage
  3. Recklessly steals innovative features and designs from others by…
    A. Patenting what is not theirs
    B. Patenting ridiculous things like standards-essential form factors (devices with rounded rectangles) for the purpose of…
  4. large-scale offensive litigation on competing companies
  5. Offers inferior products at higher prices that are often not affordable to a world demanding more affordable technology
  6. Succeeds largely a result of marketing success, not innovative success
  7. Seen as “innovators”, “leaders”, and an “inspiration”.
  8. In reality, hypocrites
So, this recent news article from BBC is making me smile like a devil. May they die in a hole.

Apple brand less ‘inspiring’, survey says – BBC News

Technology giant Apple is perceived as less “inspiring” than it was three years ago, a brand survey suggests.

The findings will heighten concerns among shareholders who have seen about $230bn wiped off Apple’s stock market value since September 2012.

Smartphone rival Samsung is now seen as equally “inspiring” in the US, says the survey by consultancy Added Value (AV).

AV is part of Sir Martin Sorrell’s marketing group WPP, whose clients include Samsung, Google and eBay.

Analysts fear Apple may have lost its way since its visionary co-founder, Steve Jobs, died in October 2011.

While Apple’s brand still scores more highly overall, Samsung’s is more consistently appreciated across the world, particularly in East Asia, says Added Value.

Apple’s reputation for market-leading innovation took a knock after the iPhone 5 was seen as an iteration of an earlier design rather than a characteristic step-change.

According to research by Gartner, Samsung and Apple now account for 52% of the global smartphone market, but in the final quarter of 2012, Samsung sold 64.5 million smartphones to Apple’s 43.5 million.

Similarly, Apple’s iPad Mini was a response to rival, smaller tablet computers already on the market, adding to the impression Apple was following, not leading.

Patent battles

In September 2012, Apple’s share price topped $700 – a record for the company – giving the tech company a market capitalisation of more than $655bn.

But since then, the price has tumbled, wiping about $230bn off the company’s value.

Since 2011, Apple and Samsung have been slugging it out across the world’s courts in a series of distracting patent battles.

Apple first sued Samsung in the US for alleged intellectual property infringements. Other court cases have taken place in France, Germany, the UK, the Netherlands, Italy, South Korea and Japan, with no company yet emerging as the clear winner.

Apple may be sitting on a $137bn cash mountain, but unless it can recapture its role as an “inspiring” technology leader and settle its legal battles, the perception may grow that its best days are behind it, analysts believe.

‘Bold and exciting’

In its Cultural Traction 2013 report, Added Value analysed the “cultural vibrancy” of 160 brands across 15 sectors, involving more than 62,000 respondents in 10 countries.

The top 10 brands perceived to be the most “visionary, inspiring, bold and exciting” were Google, Apple, Samsung, Ikea, Microsoft, Sony, BMW, Audi, Coca-Cola and eBay.

Want to know more about what I know about Apple? Visit a website I created to expose their hypocrisy: Apple Hypocrisy